Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco

 

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Picture by @njneer

 

The Walt Disney History Museum is a tribute to Walt’s life and legacy. With a much less corporate feeling, the museum is much more personal. It’s the story of the man that created an inspirational dream with a family-like team (or at least before they went on a strike on 1941). The museum is located at 104 Montgomery Street in the Presidio Park in San Francisco, California. It’s a very pleasant car ride through the woods of the park, with views of the Golden Gate Bridge.

The museum counts with 10 galleries, a theater, a cafe, a store with very curious items and animation books and a yard area open when the weather allows it.

Gallery 1:  (1901-1923)

  • Early years of Walt in Kansas. From personal drawings to his first job as a cartoonist, working for advertising companies. It also shows Walter serving in the military.

Gallery 2: (1923-1928)

  • Walt moved to Hollywood and worked for the Alice Comedies series. And the creation of the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studios and the first Mickey Mouse.

Gallery 3: (1928-1940)

  • The principle of applying character with each move to his drawings and using a storyboard brought movies like Three little pigs and Ferdinand the Bull. It was also the beginning of many other musical movies to come, with The Skeleton Dance.

Gallery 4: (1936-1938)

  • The innovative Moviola device made possible the first feature-length movie: Snow White and the seven Dwarfs.

Gallery 5: (1939-1940)

  • Disney sought more realism. For Pinocchio’s moves, they formed 3D figurines to draw every angle perfectly. for Bambi’s animals, they brought live animals in the studio understand how they move/behave.

Gallery 6: (1941-1945)

  • In battle times, the government hired the company for patriotic propaganda: Victory through Air Power. Also to promote good relations between countries, He flew to Mexico, where he also got inspiration to develop films like The Three Caballeros and Saludos Amigos.

Gallery 7: (1946-1950)

  • Innovations. Mixing live action with animation in Song of the South. First underwater filming for 20.000 Leagues under the sea.

Gallery 8: (1948-1960)

  • The bench where Walt Disney sat watching her daughters pay at the playground whole planning a better place: Disneyland.

Gallery 9: (1950-1965)

  • The opening of the Experimental Prototyped Community of Tomorrow (EPCOT) in Orlando. and of course, The Disneyland project finally is completed, opening to the public in 1955 in Anaheim.

Gallery 10: (1966)

  • A collection of the media reaction to Walts death at the age of 65. Beautiful drawing of his most remarkable characters crying for his disappearance and/or celebrating his life.

 

Maybe the best part about this museum is that is not part of the Walt Disney Entreprise. The museum is, in fact, a non-profit organization founded my Walt Disney’s daughter, Diane. Its mission is to tribute the life of his father and his legacy, inspire young artists and also teach and support those inspired by Disney. They offer programs to promote the animation field in schools, granting scholarships to schools with low-resources, organizing workshops, letting students use animation equipment on organized visits to Disney’s Studios.

TIP: If you visit around December, they sing Christmas carols at the entrance. So nice!


Hope you liked this post. If you have any comments, questions or suggestions, don’t hesitate in commenting below or contact me.  If you want to collaborate in the blog, with your experiences or your trip’s photos, get in touch!

Be wise!

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